The Utility of Developmental Behavioural Modelling (DBM®) to Identify and Enhance the Individual Learning Process: A Case Report

By Mari Carmen Abengozar and John McWhirter.

Published by The International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Individual differences in the learning process have been historically difficult to identify and successfully resolve. The Behavioral Methodology of DBM® is designed to identify these differences. This paper is an example of the utility of applying DBM® models both remedially and developmentally in the learning process of a 14 year old student’s low performance in Mathematics as well as the change work made with the psychological issues involved. The transitions which have been explored are, firstly, in terms of thinking abilities, from following others in her process of learning to leading her own learning; and, secondly, in terms of identity, from being “silly” to being “clever” (self-concept), from not being able to being able (self-worth), and from not liking herself to liking herself (self-esteem).Semi-structured interviews and a qualitative methodology have been used. The results show a change in the subject’s thinking abilities by leading her own process of learning, as well as changes in her self-concept (she thinks she is clever), self-worth (she thinks her performance depends on her) and self-esteem (she likes herself as she is). These changes have been identified in other areas such as Science and Sports. A follow up shows that changes remain.

Keywords: Case report about changes in thinking abilities and identity in a secondary school student by using DBM® models to work on her leadership and self-management during her process of learning

International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum, Volume 19, Issue 2, pp.123-137. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 541.336KB).

Dr. Mari Carmen Abengozar

Lecturer, Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain

Dr. Mari Carmen Abengozar: I’ve earned a degree in Psychology in 1990 and a PhD in Psychology in 1995 at the University of Valencia. I have been teaching the subjects from the Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, from 1992 until now. I am a Director of the University Master of “Psychological Intervention with DBM®: from Personal Development to Working with the Client”, as well as the University Diploma in Ericksonian Hypnosis, both organized by the Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology of the Faculty of Psychology, University of Valencia, from 2003 until now. The Master covers how to integrate all the main learning theories and how to use them in change work. As a researcher I am interested in understanding how the mind works by not only conducting descriptive but also intervention research along the life span from children to old people. The issues which have been studied span from Alzheimer’s disease, family and couple relationships, death and bereavement, personality development, or learning process in primary and secondary school. Lately, I have directed research on learning as part of a PhD program at the University of Valencia and on improving the learning process at sports.

John McWhirter

Director, Sensory Systems Training, Glasgow, UK

John McWhirter: I’ve earned a BA (hon) in Psychology, University of Strathclyde (1982). I have thirty years of experience in developing new therapeutic and educational change work for children, adults, families, and organizations which have included extensive experience working with children in the classrooms, family homes, street corners, and the traditional office setting. I’ve worked as a therapist, trainer, researcher, and organizational consultant. I am the creator of DBM® and Systemic Consultancy and Therapy and the Director of the University Master of “Psychological Intervention with DBM®: from Personal Development to Working with the Client”, as well as the University Diploma in Ericksonian Hypnosis, both organized by the Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology of the Faculty of Psychology, University of Valencia, from 2003 until now. The Master covers how to integrate all the main learning theories and how to use them in change work. Last year my teaching has included the research and intervention in learning process through “The Art and Science of Effective Learning level I and level II”; as well as “Transitions in Learning” at the University of Alcalá in Madrid (Spain). I’m also the coordinator of the DBM Transitions Research group, a joint venture between Sensory Systems Research (UK), the University of Valencia (Spain), and the University of Alcala (Spain).