Racism, Pedagogy, and ‘Cultural Competency’ of Psychology Students Working with Aboriginal Communities

By Andrew M. Guilfoyle.

Published by The International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum

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Article: Electronic $US5.00

This paper reflects on qualitative research methods as an epistemological safe space for teaching praxis and strategies for psychology students’ learning experiences about cultural issues and processes for working with marginalised cultural communities. A general argument for the inequities facing Australian Indigenous communities is suggested, alongside how a qualitative research methods curriculum of psychology might be one strategy to support social change. Drawing on a third year research methods unit, several case study examples of teaching praxis and strategies for including cultural content within qualitative research methodologies is provided. Evidence on the utility of such examples for learning experiences about cultural issues and processes for working with marginalised cultural communities is discussed. The paper concludes teaching qualitative research methodologies not only has capacity for differentiating and personalising instruction in a way that brings cultural issues to life for students, but do so in a culturally secure way.

Keywords: Curriculum, qualitative research, Australian Indigenous communities

International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp.255-268. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 362.676KB).

Dr Andrew M. Guilfoyle

Senior Lecturer, School of Psychology and Social Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia

Dr. Andrew Guilfoyle (PhD) is a teaching and research scholar in the School of Psychology and Social Science at Edith Cowan University. Andrew teaches interpretative research methods in psychology and his research focuses on developing sustainable services for social inclusion of Indigenous communities and CaLD populations. Andrew works within a constructionist, participatory, locational, community based approach addressing the utility and challenges of understanding and encouraging not only community involvement, but also community engagement in policy making and research.