Hong Kong Primary Teachers' Use of Differentiated Strategies

By Wai Po Eunice Wan and Sally Wai-Yan Wan.

Published by The International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Differentiation is vital to cater for learners’ diverse needs. The need for teaching adaptively is not restricted to the education of students with disabilities in mainstream classes; it also applies to the whole ability range (Postlethwaite 1993; Weston, et al. 1998). According to Education Commission (2000), schools should use diversified teaching and evaluation methods to match students’ individual needs and differences. However, there appears to be limited studies on the actual practice of differentiation in the Hong Kong context. This study is to explore Hong Kong primary teachers’ use of differentiated strategies. Teachers from a local primary school are asked to indicate their use of differentiated teaching strategies and the challenges they face in their implementation with use of a questionnaire (Chan et al., 2002)). The possible implications of the findings are then discussed.

Keywords: Hong Kong, Primary Teachers, Differentiated Strategies, Adaptive Teaching

International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp.21-30. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 159.057KB).

Wai Po Eunice Wan

EdD Candidate, School of Education, University of Nottingham, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Eunice Wan has been a subject leader for more than five years. She graduated from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, majoring in English Language in the Bachelor of Education programme. She attained a Master of Education at the University of Hong Kong, specializing in Curriculum Studies. She is a Doctor of Education candidate of the University of Nottingham (UK), focusing on researching educational leadership. Besides, she is actively engaged in knowledge building and gifted education.

Dr. Sally Wai-Yan Wan

Pui Kiu College, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Sally Wan is currently Professional Consultant at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. She had been a curriculum officer in school for more than 10 years. She graduated from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, majoring in English Language in 1996, attained a Bachelor of Education at the University of Hong Kong in 1998 and in 2002, she attained a Master of Education degree, specializing in Curriculum Studies. She is a Doctor of Education graduate of the University of Nottingham (UK), focusing on researching teachers' continuing professional development. She also actively initiates and participates in a range of international collaboration curriculum projects with schools and universities in Spain, Mexico and Singapore. Her papers were presented at international conferences in the USA, Australia, Spain, Hungary, Singapore, etc. She has been a paper reviewer of AERA Annual Meetings since 2009. Her research interests include educational leadership, teacher education, and curriculum and pedagogy.