There's No "I" in Team but There is a "U" in Group: Student Reflections on Improving the Team Assessment Experience

By Carolyn Woodley, Naomi Augar, Despina Whitefield and Maxwell Winchester.

Published by The International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: March 26, 2014 $US5.00

In Australia, team assessment has been introduced into many undergraduate and postgraduate courses. A key driver for the introduction of teamwork is that the ability to work in teams is a significant employability skill for all graduates. Furthermore, working in teams is considered to be an effective means through which to develop other employability skills such as time management, communication and people management skills. Students in the Faculty of Business and Law at Victoria University (VU) in Melbourne are expected to undertake a range of assessment tasks as members of different teams. VU’s Learning and Teaching policies make no reference to managing, designing or grading team assessment and teaching staff have adopted diverse approaches to team assessment. As the issue of team assessment has been a common complaint from students, the project sought to collect student views about team assessment with a view to improving the experience. The paper presents findings from 228 student responses to a mix of closed and open-ended questions asked via an online survey. In particular, the study examined a number of factors that students identified as contributing to a positive and negative team assessment experiences at university. Students were not necessarily opposed to team assessment as such but were concerned about the recognition of individual effort and the need for students to have some control over team membership.

Keywords: Team Assessment, Employability, Student Assessment, Teamwork, Assessment Policy

International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum, Volume 20, Issue 2, March 2014, pp.45-59. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: March 26, 2014 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 761.715KB)).

Dr Carolyn Woodley

Senior Lecturer, Sir Zelman Cowen Centre, College of Law and Justice, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Dr Carolyn Woodley is Teaching and Learning Coordinator in the College of Law and Justice at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests include the use of ICT, internationalising the curriculum, transnational quality and the use of social media in teaching. A particular research focus at present concerns social media and risk.

Dr. Naomi Augar

Senior Lecturer, College of Business, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Dr. Despina Whitefield

Senior Lecturer, College of Business, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Dr. Maxwell Winchester

Senior Lecturer, College of Business, Victoria University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia