Enhancing Embodied Conversation Agents with Initial Inventories

By Kathleen Weaver, Anita Komlodi and Brian Duffy.

Published by The International Journal of Assessment and Evaluation

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: November 7, 2014 $US5.00

This paper presents a survey of Computerized Conversation Agents, specifically Embodied Conversation Agents, which are used in a variety of situations to engage humans in activities, including tutoring, entertainment, and military settings. These state of the art Embodied Conversation Agents interact with users in natural language (i.e. words used to communicate with other humans) to teach, entertain, and counsel. We propose that if these Embodied Conversation Agents conduct a cognitive inventory with each user at the beginning of the interaction that the sessions will be more personalized, and therefore more meaningful to and productive for the participants.

Keywords: Cognitive Assessment, Conversation Agent, Avatar

International Journal of Assessment and Evaluation, Volume 20, Issue 4, November 2014, pp.1-12. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: November 7, 2014 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 526.475KB)).

Kathleen Weaver

Doctoral Student, Information Systems, Human Centered Computing, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, USA

After receiving a Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, Kathy has taught in a variety of settings for the past 20 years. She started by teaching kindergarten in a public school, then she consulted with large corporations and government agencies to implement SAP, which focused on training employees. She also has taught at community colleges and universities as an adjunct instructor through out the years. Kathy received her Master of Arts in Instructional Systems Development at University of Maryland, Baltimore County and is currently working on a doctoral degree in Human Centered Computing from UMBC. Her research interests are focused on performing cognitive assessments with computer conversation agents, in order to assist users in discovering their strengths and weaknesses in their learning and eventually producing products that can help the users become better learners.

Dr. Anita Komlodi

Associate Professor, Information Systems, Human Centered Computing, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, USA

Brian Duffy

Chief Technology Officer, Carney, Inc., Washington, DC, USA