Experiences of Parenting among Burmese Refugee Mothers: Social Support in a Playgroup

By Beth McLaughlin and Andrew M. Guilfoyle.

Published by The International Journal of Early Childhood Learning

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Parenting is a critical element in the wellbeing of children and the focus on early years (Mustard, 2008; Mustard & Young, 2007) has meant increased energy on maximizing early childhood learning by considering the influences of family and social/cultural environments on parenting, and connecting with early childhood education such as playgroups, day-care, preschool, and kindergartens. Psychological literature suggests that parenting in an unfamiliar culture can be one of the more significant challenges experienced by refugee families. However, the factors affecting refugee parenting and how parents can be supported continues to be poorly understood.

Keywords: Theme: Early Childhood Learning, Early Childhood Learning, Parenting, Refugee

The International Journal of Early Childhood Learning, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp.35-49. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 302.921KB).

Beth McLaughlin

Honours Student, School of Psychology and Social Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia

Assoc. Prof. Andrew M. Guilfoyle

Senior Lecturer, School of Psychology and Social Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia

Dr. Andrew Guilfoyle (PhD) is a senior lecturer in the School of Psychology and Social Science at Edith Cowan University. Andrew has published over fifty peer reviewed publications, completed several large scale national and regional funded projects, and regularly presents this work at international forums. His research is focused on developing sustainable services for social inclusion of Indigenous communities and CaLD populations. He works within a constructionist, participatory, locational, community based approach.