The Relative Efficacy of Government Policy and Self-concept on Reentry into School in Abia State and Imo State, Nigeria

By Blessing Ijeoma Ohanaka and Henrietta Ijeoma Alika.

Published by The International Journal of Learner Diversity and Identities

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: May 20, 2014 $US5.00

Education, the most important instrument of change, fosters the worth and development of individuals and the society. Nigeria’s philosophy of education is based on the provision of equal access to educational opportunities for all citizens of the country at all levels, both inside and outside the formal school system. Along with this, the federal and state governments, non-governmental agencies, individuals, and educators have been concerned and challenged by the ways and means of catering the learning needs of students who have dropped out of school. This study investigated the relative efficacy of government policy and self-concept on reentry into school in Abia and Imo states of Nigeria. One hundred and sixty-one (161) and two hundred and two (202) students who reenrolled into schools in Abia and Imo states respectively participated in the study. Four continuing education and two skills acquisition schools were randomly selected from each state. Three research questions and two hypotheses were formulated for the study. The data was collected using a questionnaire developed and validated by the researchers and experts in the area of study. Results showed a significant difference between Abia and Imo States in the efficacy of government policy on reentry into school, indicating that Imo had more a effective government policy. There was no significant difference in the efficacy of self-concept. It was therefore recommended that stronger and more influential government policy should be put in place in Abia to encourage students to go back to school. School counsellors should use behaviour modification techniques to boost students’ self-concept, with a view to substituting desirable behaviour (reentry into school) for undesirable one (drop out from school).

Keywords: Reentry, Government Policy, Self-concept, Continuing Education, Skills Acquisition, Relative Efficacy

International Journal of Learner Diversity and Identities, Volume 20, Issue 3, May 2014, pp.1-9. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: May 20, 2014 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 406.922KB)).

Dr. Blessing Ijeoma Ohanaka

Lecturer, Department of Educational Psychology and Curriculum Studies, University of Benin, Benin, Edo, Nigeria

Blessing Ijeoma Ohanaka is a counselling psychologist and a lecturer in the Department of Educational Psychology and Curriculum Studies, University of Benin in Benin City, Nigeria. Her areas of research interest include study habits, dropout and re-entry into school, gender studies and behaviour modification

Dr. Henrietta Ijeoma Alika

Lecturer, Department of Educational Psychology and Curriculum Studies, University of Benin, Benin, Edo, Nigeria

Henrietta Ijeoma Alika is a counselling psychologist and a lecturer in the Department of Educational Psychology and Curriculum Studies, University of Benin in Benin City, Nigeria. Her areas of research interest include dropout and re-entry into school and gender studies. She has also carried out researches in counselling and psychology.