Investigating Memory Strategies and Motor Memory in Dyslexic and Non-dyslexic Children

By Elissavet Theodoridou, Anastasia Alevriadou, Klio Semoglou and Sofia D. Anastasiadou.

Published by The International Journal of Learner Diversity and Identities

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Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: May 20, 2014 $US5.00

Many studies have examined the relation of dyslexia to the existence of difficulties in the processing and coding of information, demonstrating memory deficits. However, these deficits in memory have not been specified. The purpose of the present study was to investigate memory strategies in dyslexic and non-dyslexic children. A group of 20 children with dyslexia was compared with a group of 20 children without dyslexia, matched for chronological age, gender, and hand preference. Participants ranged in age from 9 to 12 years old and came from fourth, fifth, and sixth grade classes of primary schools located in the area of Ptolemaida (Greece). A series of tasks were used to assess different aspects of memory (visual, auditory, verbal and motor memory). Results showed that the children with dyslexia performed less well than the control group on all the tasks included in the study. However, data indicated that the performance of the dyslexia group was heterogeneous (both high and low scores) on all the tasks of the study confirming the idea that dyslexia differs from child to child and has qualitatively distinct subtypes. Thus, it is suggested that dyslexia demands individual teaching according to each child’s specific memory deficits.

Keywords: Dyslexia, Visual Memory, Auditory Memory, Verbal Memory, Motor Memory

International Journal of Learner Diversity and Identities, Volume 20, Issue 3, May 2014, pp.25-44. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: May 20, 2014 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 489.251KB)).

Elissavet Theodoridou

Preschool teacher, Department of Early Childhood Education, University of Western Macedonia, Florina, Greece

Elissavet Theodoridou is a preschool teacher (Department of Early Childhood Education-University of Western Macedonia). She holds a master degree in Special Education and she works in University of Western Macedonia. She has participated in some research projects concerning motor learning and teaching in primary education.

Dr. Anastasia Alevriadou

Assistant Professor, School of Education, Department of Early Childhood Education, University of Western Macedonia, Greece, Florina, Greece

Anastasia Alevriadou is an Assistant Professor of Psychology of Special Education in the University of Western Macedonia – Greece. She teaches: ‘Teaching Special Education’, ‘Developmental Psychopathology’, ‘Learning Disabilities’. She has published more than 50 articles in Greek and international journals on these issues and she has participated in many European and International conferences. 3RD AUTHOR -Athina Geladari is a teacher in Primary Education and a postgraduate student (School of Education - UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN MACEDONIA).

Dr. Klio Semoglou

Instructor, Department of Primary Education, University of Western Macedonia, Florina, Greece

Klio Semoglou is an instructor at University of Western Macedonia - Greece. Her main research interest is in complex movement behaviour, fine motor skills/graphomotor skills, eye-hand coordination and gender differences. She has participated in many European and International conferences and she has published several articles in Greek and international journals on these issues.

Dr. Sofia D. Anastasiadou

Assosiate Professor, Department of Preeschool Education, University of Western Macedonia, Thessaloniki, Greece

Sofia Anastasiadou holds a BSc from the Department of Mathematics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece, a Master degree in Mathematics Education from Surrey University of Kingston in Great Bretagne. She has obtained her Ph.D in Multidimetional Statistical Analysis at the Macedonia University of Thessaloniki in Greece. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Applied Statistics and Educational Research in the Department of Preschool Education at the University of Western Macedonia in Greece. Apart from Statistics and Mathematics Education in Primary, Secondary and Higher Education her research interests are also focused in the Analysis and Interpretation of Multivariate Data for Social Science. Sofia Anastasiadou has published more than 120 papers in Greek, European and International Scientific Journals.