Secondary Students’ Analogical Reflections on Unfamiliar Scientific Concepts

By Georgios Kritikos and Angelique Dimitracopoulou.

Published by The International Journal of Technologies in Learning

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: June 28, 2017 $US5.00

In this article, we describe a method of reflection, analogical reflection, and present a supportive software tool, called ART (Analogical Reflection Tool). We focus on the contribution of analogical reflection to students’ comprehension of unfamiliar scientific concepts. There are two basic categories of reflection: self-reflection and comparative reflection. In self-reflection, the learner reflects on his or her actions. In comparative reflection, the learner reflects on others’ actions. We propose an alternative reflection type as a subcategory of comparative reflection: analogical reflection. In analogical reflection, students reflect on analogies, collating their actions with the analog’s functions. The hypothesis of our research is the following: If the learners study an analogical model, they will improve their performance, comprehending the unfamiliar scientific concept “electric capacitance” and identifying their alternative conceptions. According to the results, analogical reflection on unfamiliar concepts through ART appeared to be effective only after the students completed the learning activities. ART guides the students to make use of their existing knowledge, comprehend the studied domain, revise their alternative conceptions, and validate their correct perceptions.

Keywords: Analogies, Modeling, Reflection

The International Journal of Technologies in Learning, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp.25-36. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: June 28, 2017 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 453.237KB)).

Dr. Georgios Kritikos

Postdoc Researcher, Learning Technology and Educational Engineering Laboratory, University of the Aegean, Rhodes, Dodecanese, Greece

Angelique Dimitracopoulou

Professor, Learning Technology and Educational Engineering Laboratory, University of the Aegean, Rhodes, Dodecanese, Greece