Implementing Program Change: The Importance of Tying Learning Objectives to Accreditation

By Jean Filetti and Mary Wright.

Published by The International Journal of Educational Organization and Leadership

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

From 2009 to the present, [the authors] contributed their respective expertise to overhaul Christopher Newport University’s functioning but stale freshman writing course. This uncommon alliance was necessary when scrutinizing and making meaningful changes to a course serving 80% of the freshman population attending a 5000-student liberal arts university in the mid-Atlantic region and deeply embedded with a number of core objectives and a complicated state-mandated assessment procedure. We examine the importance of our alliance in terms of assessment (internal and external) in composition programs and the type of assessment data we three compiled and analyzed in order to carefully assess the first-year writing seminar and successfully move the pedagogical focus from argumentation to genre writing without sacrificing the university’s accreditation.

Keywords: Writing Program Change, University Accreditation, Administrative Collaboration

The International Journal of Educational Organization and Leadership, Volume 19, Issue 2, pp.19-27. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 258.403KB).

Prof. Jean Filetti

Associate Professor and Chair, English Department, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, USA

An Associate Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English at Christopher Newport University, Dr. Filetti has published articles on service-learning, liberal learning, faculty mentoring, and faculty evaluation.

Mary Wright

Associate Professor of English and Writing Program Director, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, USA

Professor Mary Wright is an Associate Professor of English and Director of Christopher Newport University's Writing Program and Writing Center. She has published articles on composition studies and faculty grading practices.