Learning Science through Traditional Thai Musical Instruments: An Elective Science Course for Non-science Students

By Chaninan Pruekpramool, Nason Phonphok, Orvil L. White and Kusalin Musikul.

Published by The International Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Learning

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The purposes of this study was to develop the Science of Sound in Traditional Thai Musical Instruments Interdisciplinary course (SoSTI course) for Thai non-science upper secondary school students; and to study the students’ understanding in science of sound concepts, the students’ scientific creativity, the students’ attitude toward science, and the students’ awareness of the precious Thai culture and traditions, especially traditional Thai musical instruments before and after completing the SoSTI course. The SoSTI course is an elective course corresponding to the Basic Education Core Curriculum B.E. 2551 (A.D. 2008). This course was conducted for one semester with thirty five non-science twelfth grade students in the second semester of 2010 academic year at a school in Bangkok, Thailand. The SoSTI course development was based on constructivist theory and the interdisciplinary concept model proposed by Jacobs (1989). The research instruments were the science of sound understanding test, students’ scientific creativity test, students’ attitude toward science questionnaire, the students’ awareness in traditional Thai musical instruments questionnaire, and students’ opinions toward the SoSTI course questionnaire. The data were statistically analyzed by using t-test for dependent sample. The findings of this study indicated that, after completing this course, the students’ understanding in the science of sound concept posttest score is significantly higher than the pretest one at .05 level. The students’ scientific creativity has significantly increased at the .05 level. The students’ attitude toward science before and after completing the SoSTI course is not significantly different at the .05 level. Lastly, after participating in the SoSTI course, the students have become more aware of Thai culture and traditions and have positive opinions toward the course.

Keywords: Non-science Students, Course Development, Scientific Creativity, Attitude toward Science

The International Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Learning, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp.147-163. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 619.181KB).

Dr. Chaninan Pruekpramool

Faculty, Lecturer, Science Education Center, Srinakharinwirot University and Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand

Chaninan is a faculty member at the Science Education Center, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok, Thailand. She received a scholarship from the Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology, Bangkok, Thailand to study science education. She has graduted Doctor of Education in science education in 2011. During her study, she attended the State University of New York at Cortland as a visiting scholar for one year. Her dissertation topic is about science curriculum development by using an interdisciplinary curriculum and an integrated teaching approach.

Dr Nason Phonphok

Director of Science Education Center, Srinakharinwirot University and Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand

Dr. Orvil L. White

Faculty, Childhood and Early Childhood Department, State University of New York College at Cortland, Cortland, New York, USA

Dr. Kusalin Musikul

Acting Director of Primary Science Department, Primary Science Department, The Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology Bangkok, Thailand, Primary Science Department, The Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology, Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand