Completion and Passing Rates of Online Math Courses and How to Improve Them

By Sandra Fital-Akelbek and Mahmud Akelbek.

Published by The International Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Learning

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Online math courses are usually less successful than traditional face-to-face courses offered on campus because of limited resources available to students and instructors. In 2009 and 2010, we offered an online math course with a new design and incorporation of recorded lectures, which significantly improved passing and completion rates. In this mixed method study, we compare academic achievements of online students with traditional students taking the same course on campus. We also investigate student satisfaction of the online math course, and we show factors that contributed to the success of the online course. We hope that this paper will give ideas and encourage others to design and offer online math courses despite the limitations of cost efficient technology available to students.

Keywords: Distance Learning, Online courses, Math Education

The International Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Learning, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp.1-10. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 879.258KB).

Dr. Sandra Fital-Akelbek

Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics, Weber State University, Ogden, Utah, USA

Sandra Fital-Akelbek is an Assistant Professor at Weber State University. She received her Ph.D. in mathematics from University of Regina in Canada. For several years she has been involved in mathematics education and distance education. She had designed and delivered several online math courses: College Algebra, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus. Her online courses are very popular and they are usually filled within the first day of registration.

Dr. Mahmud Akelbek

Assistant Professor, Department of Mathematics, Weber State University, Ogden, Utah, USA

Mahmud Akelbek is an Assistant Professor at Weber State University. His research area is in discrete mathematics and statistics. He had designed and delivered very successful hybrid courses in statistics.