Teaching Kindergartners Abstractions

By Robert Pasnak, Julie K. Kidd, Marinka K. Gadzichowski, Deborah Gallington, Robin Saracina and Katherine Addison.

Published by The Learner Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Children who have not developed normal levels of abstract thought were randomly divided into four groups. One group was taught to select odd objects from sets of objects, to insert objects into the appropriate place in a s eries, and to conserve number. A second group was taught letters and letter sounds (kindergarten literacy). A third group was taught numeracy, and a fourth social studies. The group taught abstractions matched the literacy group in literacy and exceeded it in numeracy, matched the numeracy group in numeracy and exceeded it in literacy, and exceeded the social studies group in both literacy and numeracy. It appears that mastering these forms of early abstract thought enables children to understand classroom lessons better and hence improves their academic progress.

Keywords: Cognitive, At-risk, Academics

The International Journal of Learning, Volume 13, Issue 11, pp.1-6. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 826.777KB).

Dr. Robert Pasnak

Professor, Department of Psychology, George MasonUniversity, Fairfax, Virginia, USA

Early work, at the Catholic University of America, was on diverse topics. Since moving to George Mason University in 1972, studies have focused on perceptual learning and cognitive development. Many involve evaluating interventions to help children with disabilites or academic problems.

Dr. Julie K. Kidd

Assistant Professor, College of Education and Human Development, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA

After working as a teacher, reading specialist, and administrator Dr. Kidd joined the George Mason University faculty in 1999. She has served as a journal editor and co-editor, on editorial boards, and as a guest reviewer. She has published numerous articles on early childhood literacy. Dr. Kidd teaches graduate courses in her specialities, and is formally associated with the Early Childhood and Literacy programs.

Marinka K. Gadzichowski

Manager, Department of Psychology, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA

Ms. Gadzichowski has conducted and published research on cognitive interventions for mentally challenged children and children enrolled in Head Start programs. She currently manages a large research project funded by the Institute of Educational Sciences. This is directed at improving the cognitive development and academic performance of at-risk kindergartners.(R03H030031)

Deborah Gallington

Manager, College of Education and Human Development, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA

After holding a variety of professional positions, Ms. Gallington has worked first as a research assistant and then as a manager of a large project for the Institute of Educational Sciences. The project is an evaluation of an intervention designed to improve the academic achievement of at-risk kindergartners.(R03H030031)

Ms Robin Saracina

Manager, College of Education and Human Development, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA

After holding a variety of positions, Ms. Saracina manages projects funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Development, and by the Institute of Educational Sciences. The first project is designed to devise and evaluate measures of children's emotional development (R03H030031).The second is an evaluation of an intervention designed to improve the academic achievement of at-risk kindergartners

Ms. Katherine Addison

Manager, Department of Psychology, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA

After serving as a graduate research assistant, Ms. Addison has managed a large Research project funded by the Institute of Educational Sciences. This project is an evaluation of a cognitve intervention for at-risk kindergartners(R03H030031) .She also manages a project funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Development to evaluate measures of social and amotional development of preschoolers.

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