Evaluating Teacher Education Reform Projects in Developing Countries: A Case Study of Teacher Educational Reform in Egypt

By Kazuaki Hashimoto, Hitendra Pillay and Peter Hudson.

Published by The Learner Collection

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Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

The importance of developing local capacity to evaluate the impact of interventions has been highlighted as a new solution to an old problem in educational reform in developing countries. Due to “aid fatigue” experienced by
the international community in the 1990s, international aid agencies have recognised that development interventions can not materialize educational outcomes successfully, without enhancing the local capacity and
ownership in developing countries. One of the issues with “aid fatigue” was the limited attention given to monitoring and evaluation activities, particularly by the local stakeholders. Against the above concern, evaluation processes need to be devised to determine the impact of educational interventions in developing countries and, simultaneously, enhance local capacity development in this
field. This study examined evaluation for a teacher education reform project in Egypt, namely by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), which implements Japan’s official development assistance at a governmental
level. The data were collected from various layers of participants of the project through archival documents, interviews and questionnaire survey. The archival documents indicate that the evaluation process was designed and conducted by JICA mainly for their internal compliance requirement and focused on educational intervention. In contrast, however, the empirical data suggested that the local capacity development as well as the educational interventions should be evaluated jointly and not just by the donor agencies but also by the local stakeholders.

Keywords: Evaluation, Capacity Development, International Cooperation, Educational Reform, Teacher Education, Developing Country

The International Journal of Learning, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp.123-132. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 701.811KB).

Kazuaki Hashimoto

PhD student, School of Learning and Professional Studies, Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Kazauaki Hashimoto is currently a PhD student at Queensland University of Technology, Australia. He, as a development consultant, has been involved in educational development in several developing countries for more than 10 years, advising on project formulation, implementation and monitoring/evaluation. His research interest focuses on evaluation for educational reform projects in developing countries.

Prof. Hitendra Pillay

Professor, School of Learning and Professional Studies, Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Hitendra Pillay is Professor in the School of Learning and Professional Studies at the Queensland University of Technology in Australia. His interest in the nature and development of knowledge and the systems theory has led to a diverse academic research portfolio that includes areas such as, distributed/social cognition and learning, adult and community education, industry based training, and technology based learning. He also has extensive expertise in macro and micro aspects of social sector reform in developing countries. He has worked for the World Bank and Asian Development Bank on associated projects in the Balkans, the Caucasus region, the Central and South East Asian, and the South Pacific region. Drawing on his academic research and social sector development work his current research interest is on synthesising the fragmented research agendas into more holistic and cross disciplinary models of knowledge creation, innovation and global development.

Prof. Peter Hudson

Senior Lecturer, School of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education , Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Dr. Peter Hudson is a senior lecturer in the School of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education at the Queensland University of Technology in Australia. His teaching career spans 25 years in primary schools including 10 years as a teaching principal. His lecturing experiences since 1990 include: Science Education, mathematics, Human Society and Its Environment, and TESOL education. He currently has involvement with developing and implementing a new degree in Malaysia, and has taught and/or coordinated various international programs.

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