An Ecological Approach to Supporting Children after Parental Separation: Resilience, Social Capital and Sense of Community in the School Classroom

By Andrew M. Guilfoyle, Vicki Banham, Tara Cavazzi and Rosa Napolitano-Lincoln.

Published by The Learner Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Parental separation and divorce is a significant social issue in Australia. There are well reported academic, behavioural, psychological and social difficulties faced by children and adolescents of divorce. In this paper we suggest that a school classroom-based intervention which aims can directly engage children in an open discussion of parental
separation and divorce in a supportive environment to help children build a preventative collective action for their resilience (Chaskin, 2008).

Keywords: Separation, Children, Young People, Family, Rights, United Nations, Systems Theory, Resiliency Theory

The International Journal of Learning, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp.315-336. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 853.257KB).

Assoc. Prof. Andrew M. Guilfoyle

Senior Lecturer, School of Psychology and Social Science, School of Psychology and Social Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Dr. Andrew Guilfoyle (PhD) is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology and Social Science at Edith Cowan University. Andrew has published over 50 peer reviewed publications, completed several large scale national and regional funded projects and regularly presents this work at international forums. His research is focused researching sustainable services for social inclusion of Indigenous communities and CaLD populations within a constructivist, participatory, locational, community based approach. His recent book chapter on Participation with Australian Aboriginal Communities’ (Elsevier Ltd: London) received an outstanding international review by Prof. Ron Chenail, Editor of The Qualitative Report (http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/): “Participatory Action Research as Empowerment Evaluation: Andrew Guilfoyle, Juli Coffin, and Paul Maginn illustrate the utility and challenges of understanding and encouraging not only community involvement, but also community engagement in policy making and evaluation.”

Dr. Vicki Banham

Senior Lecturer, School of Psychology and Social Science..Faculty of Computing,Health and Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Dr. Vicki Banham (PhD) is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology and Social Science at Edith Cowan University and a member of the Social Justice Research Centre at ECU, coordinating and lecturing in early years development. She is a teacher by background focusing on the early and middle years. Her research interests lie in understanding the learning process of children and young people; minimising harm in the community; and children’s active participation in their ongoing development. Her publications, including her recent book chapter publication: ‘Infants and toddlers and the power of play in developing young minds’ (In ‘Play in Early Childhood Education’, Melbourne: Oxford University Press) focus on empowering children through interaction within their known contexts, on their learning journey.

Tara Cavazzi

Researcher, School of Psychology and Spocial Science, Faculty of Computing,Health and Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Tara is a Masters candidate in the School of Psychology and Social Science, Edith Cowan University and has worked in the area of foster care and supporting children after parental separation.

Rosa Napolitano-Lincoln

Sessional Lecturer- International Programs, Edith Cowan University, School of Psychology and Social Science, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Rosa has worked and researched throughout Western Australia within a variety of educational, community and developmental contexts. Her current research centres on Aboriginal children and the early learning experiences that they bring to the formal educational settings, and the issues ensuring that the ‘school is ready to teach the child’. Her thesis (work in progress) titled ‘Analysing Leadership Pathways for Rural Women’ examines the challenges that confront rural women in attaining leadership and decision making positions whilst implementing and trialling a ‘program’ to address the gender inbalance.

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